Honeybucket Trail Saturday, Sep 16 2017 

Granite Mountain

Granite Mountain

Honeybucket Trail #333 is another new 2017 Prescott area trail that we learned about from this year’s “Take a Hike!” program. The greatest difficulty with this trail is getting there. We needed to travel 1.6 miles on Thumb Butte Loop Road, a very rough dirt road with huge pot holes. The trailhead starts at an elevation of 6,400 feet and descends to 6,100 feet. Lots of wildflowers were in bloom with occasional distant views of Granite Mountain and Thumb Butte. The biggest surprise was spotting a post for Frisbee golf. We looped a short distance on Thumb Butte Bypass Trail #326 to cover about 3.45 miles.

Earlier in the day on a field trip to the Gold Pan area off Lynx Creek Road we identified the following wildflowers: curly dock, common mullein, bitter & eggs, tufted four o’clock, littleleadf globemallow, slimleaf lima bean, scruffy prairie clover, Wright’s deervetch, white sweet clover, yellow sweet clover, large-flowered brickella, western yarrow, prickly lettuce, spreading fleabane, Arizona cudweed, tansy aster, camphorweed, wild chysanthemum, and Wright beeflower. Arizona is a great place for wildflowers!

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Piglet Trail Sunday, Sep 10 2017 

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Piglet Trail #328, completed in early 2017, is a short trail in the North Thumb Butte complex of trails. From the Thumb Butte parking lot, we started on Watertank Trail #315 which connects with the Ridgetop Trail #317. We noted views of Thumb Butte. We walked a short distance to a gate that leads to homes adjacent to the Prescott National Forest. The Piglet Trail begins there and descends 218 feet before connecting with Pine Lakes Trail #316. We spotted a turkey vulture eyeing us while airing its wings. We also viewed Granite Mountain. We returned to the Thumb Butte parking area on this trail as it started to rain. This is our second 2017 “Take a Hike!”

Canyon Trail Sunday, Sep 10 2017 

Sunflower

Sunflower

Because it was raining yesterday morning, we decided not to participate in this year’s Hiking Spree 2017 Kickoff at the Highlands Center for Natural History. In the afternoon, however, we drove into Willow Lake Park for our first official “Take a Hike!” We followed the Approach Trail to the Canyon Trail and followed this loop trail that winds through rock canyons and over granite boulders referred to as “slick rock.” Several wildflowers were in bloom including sunflowers near the trailhead. It was interesting to observe pools of clear water in the washes and in boulder depressions. We did not take side trips up the Apex Trail or the James Trail. On our return to Prescott, we parked by the post office and circled the Yavapai Courthouse a couple of times. I took pictures of the “Cowboy at Rest” sculpture by Solon Borglum on the south side of the Courthouse Plaza and “100 Years of Rodeo” by Ralph Terry in front of the City of Prescott offices.

2017 Yavapai County Fair Saturday, Sep 9 2017 

Punkin Display

Punkin Display

Yesterday we visited the Yavapai County Fair held on the Prescott Rodeo Grounds. I especially enjoy touring the Photography exhibit where there are some amazing pictures. I would like to learn more about how a few of the pictures were printed on metal. The Fine Arts Display included a pottery wheel demo. I was not impressed with the artists selling their work. The Garden & Flower Exhibits are always interesting. How do they keep the bees in a closed hive? Who did the sign spelling for the “punkins?” Brown’s Amusements is responsible for the Fair’s Carnival. I’m always envious of the young people who ride the Ferris Wheel, Yo Yo, Zipper, and other dizzying rides. We were bemused at the perfect line-up of Brown’s trucks in numerical order. We briefly noted the small stock showmanship in the Show Tent. We departed during the warm-up for Ranch Rodeo. Fair food can be tempting (and expensive), but we chose to visit a local restaurant. We hope the weekend’s sporadic rain showers don’t dampen this year’s County Fair.

In the morning we visited the Prescott Creeks Association riparian site near Watson Lake where we identified the following wildflowers: Hooker’s evening primrose, lizard-tail, common mullein, sweet four o’clocks, scarlet spiderling, buffalo gourd, littleleaf globemallow, bird’s foot morning glory, scarlet creeper, wooly morning glory, field bindweed, buffalo-bur, sacred datura, and scruffy prairie clover.

Sharlot Hall Museum Tuesday, Sep 5 2017 

Fort Misery

Fort Misery

Sharlot Hall Museum is one of Prescott’s treasures, and one we haven’t visited in a while. Yesterday we visited with two children leading the way. The rose garden, dedicated to territorial women, was in full display. We took note of Sharlot Hall’s copper dress and typewriter. She was a visionary woman to save the Governor’s Mansion and lay the foundation for this historical museum. Fort Misery, the oldest log cabin in Arizona (1864), was the 1st law office in Arizona, the 1st general store in Central Arizona, the 1st Protestant worship house in Central Arizona, the 1st boarding house in Central Arizona, and the 1st courthouse in Arizona. We were impressed with the professional displays throughout our tour. I learned about the “Horrible’s” who wore “fantastic” costumes while parading around the plaza during July 4th celebrations from 1881-1894 and played “horrible” music and presented impressive orations. It was impressive to see small critters that the eyes of our guests spotted in many exhibits. Of course, they were very interested in the mummified mouse found during renovations of the Governor’s Mansion. A good day learning about the history of Central Arizona.

Tom Moody Trail Thursday, Aug 24 2017 

Tom Moody Trail Petroglyphs

Tom Moody Trail Petroglyphs

We spent the last night of our five-week RV adventure in the J&H RV Park in Flagstaff, Arizona. We hiked the nearby Tom Moody Trail, a flat 2.8-mile loop that is part of the 478-acre Picture Canyon Natural & Cultural Preserve. The Rio de Flag, which originates from springs on the southwestern slopes of the San Francisco Peaks, flows adjacent to part of the trail. We especially enjoyed seeing the petroglyphs featuring zig zag and celestial images. Part of the Tom Moody Trail corresponds with a small segment of the 800-mile Arizona Trail. After our hike, I found the following reference online from the Daily Sun (1-27-2009): “Thomas Oakley Moody, 57, died with his good friend Frank Protina when their small plane crashed early on Friday, Jan. 23, 2009. They were [on] the way to a river restoration project near Yuma.” The Don Weaver Trail is only 0.7 miles long and would be another interesting adventure.

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