Burney Falls

Burney Falls

If the road in Lassen Volcanic Falls was open, we would not have discovered Burney Falls. This magnificent 129-foot waterfall is the centerpiece of the McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park. The Ilmani and other Native Americans consider Burney Falls sacred. Fortunately, in 1922 the McArthur family, after lobbying the State of California, generously donated Burney Falls and the surrounding area to the State. The Park was established in 1926 and starting in 1934 the Civilian Conservation Corps built trails and other facilities. We hiked the Falls Loops Trail that follows Burney Creek. At the Rainbow Bridge, we detoured on a trail that leads to a PSEA Camp. I have since learned that the acronym stands for Pacific Service Employees Association, a non-profit for employees and retirees of PG&E. We drove to the boat launch on Lake Britton. On our return to the Visitor’s Center we spotted a handsome buck. Sal and Nancy Gutilla have dedicated a bench that has engraved “Breathe in the beauty – it is all good.” This 90-acre state park is a treasure.

Subway Cave

Subway Cave

In the afternoon, we headed a few miles south of our campsite to visit the Subway Cave Geologic Area. This is an easy one-third mile walk through a lava tube that was formed from the Hat Creek Lava Flow. Several other visitors with children arrived at the same time we did. There constant chatter diminished our experience. After returning to the parking area above ground, we decided to walk the Subway Cave again. On the second pass, we had the lava tube to ourselves and returned to the entrance underground, relishing the solitude and the forty degree temperatures.

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