My Gal Sal

My Gal Sal

On the Friday beginning the Memorial Day weekend we visited the National World War II Museum that “tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world – why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today.” We started with the powerful 4-D “Beyond All Boundaries” narrated by Tom Hanks shown on the 120-feet wide screen in the Solomon Victory Theater using nine digital cinema DLP projectors with 27 speakers. The theater seats vibrate when tanks are shown. Different objects are used effectively on stage at appropriate times such as a B-17 nose cone, a guard tower, an anti-aircraft gun, and “Dragons Teeth” tank traps. We also took advantage of the unique “Final Mission: USS Tang Submarine Experience” where visitors are assigned a section within this recreated submarine. We were stationed on the Hull Opening Indicator Panel while we participated in this submarine’s last mission. The Museum offers another unique way to learn by assigning each guest a dog tag. Within the Museum’s Union Pacific Foundation Train Station, we registered for our Dog Tag Experience. My luck of the draw assigned me Paul Tibbets, who joined the Army Air Corps in 1937, became the personal pilot for his skeet-shooting buddy, George S. Patton, was the pilot that took Dwight Eisenhower to a secret meeting, and flew the Enolay Gay, the B-29 that dropped “Little Boy” on Hiroshima. We passed through immersive galleries on two different floors, one devoted to the European Theater, the other to the Pacific. This Museum, associated with the Smithsonian Institution, is an instructive way to learn about the price of freedom from America’s involvement in World War II.

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