Henry Moore Sculpture

Henry Moore Sculpture

On Tuesday, we visited the Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, located on five acres, that displays more than 60 sculptures. We enjoyed meandering along the footpaths shaded by Spanish moss-laden 200-year-old live oaks. Some of the sculptures we particularly enjoyed were the following: Henry Moore’s “Reclining Mother and Child,” Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ “Diana,” Do-Ho Suh’s “Karma,” Leandro Erlich’s “Window with Ladder – Too Late for Help,” Gaston Lachaise’s “Heroic Man,” Elisabeth Frink’s “Riace Warriors,” Robert Graham’s “Source Figure,” Audrey Flack’s “Civitas,” William Zorach’s “Future Generations, and Michael Sandle’s “The Drummer.”

The Sculpture Garden is adjacent to the New Orleans Museum of Art, known for its strengths in French and American art, and African and Japanese works. Our walk through started on the third floor in a special exhibit devoted to local artist Regina Scully, “Japanese Landscape: Inner Journeys.” Several of her pieces use one color. The juxtaposition of her work with traditional Japanese landscapes encouraged reflection on imaginary journeys. Another special exhibit focuses on local artist Jim Steg. He used many media, especially print-making. I liked the colors painted on wood in Alessandro Mendini’s “Proust Armchair.” The museum includes “Woman in an Armchair” by Pablo Picasso. The most unusual piece for me was Will Ryman’s “America.” He gold-plated a log cabin with access to various materials composing the interior.

Sunflower

Sunflower

The entrance to the New Orleans Botanical Garden is also located in City Park, a half-mile from the Museum of Art. The Garden contains several sculptures by Enrique Alferez and a Hellis Foundation exhibit that celebrates the life and work of this artist. The Rose Parterre features several colorful roses such as “Winter Sun” and “Coretta Scott King.” The Lily Pond showcases several varieties of water lilies. The Japanese Garden Society of New Orleans needs to take better care of the Yakumo Nihon Telen Japanese Garden. I especially liked the sunflowers in the Plano Demonstration Garden. We enjoyed our walk through the Garden.

Orangutan

Orangutan

The Audubon Zoo, named after local ornithologist John James Audubon, has an interesting collection of animals with generally large exhibits and much shadier walkways than anticipated. We saw several animals that I have not previously seen such as a babirua, capybara, and nutria. Many animals were active like a sun bear, a Sumatran orangutan, the Asian elephants, and giraffes. A peacock honored us with a full view of its plumage. One emu, separated from another, kept trying to position itself to see its mate. One spider monkey demonstrated its ability to hang by its tail. We got a closeup view of an anteater and several African painted dogs. The alligators in the Louisiana Swamp display were scary. Not the ones sunning on a dock, but those showing only their eyes in the water covered with green growth. We also admired a rare white alligator.

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