Douglas Skyhawk Attack Bomber

Douglas Skyhawk Attack Bomber

The Pima Air & Space Museum is one of the largest aviation museums in the country. I have previously visited the National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C., the National Museum of the U. S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, and the William E. Boeing Red Barn Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. What impressed me most about the Pima Air & Space Museum was the amazing array of sizes and shapes of aircraft on display. It is hard to believe all of these planes can fly. When we entered Hangar 1, the Starr Bumble Bee was one of the first exhibits. In 1984 it was recognized as the smallest aircraft ever flown. It has a wingspan of 6 feet, 6 inches; a length of 9 feet, 4 inches; and a height of 4 feet, one inch. We took an open air tram tour of the aircraft located on the grounds. We had trouble hearing the narration that competed with several youngster’s voices. The tour included several fighters such as the Douglas A4D Skyhawk Attack Bomber. We also saw commercial and civil aircraft, transport and utility aircraft, Presidential and VIP aircraft, NASA aircraft, tankers, electronic aircraft, bombers, trainers, foreign fighters, and helicopters. We entered the 390th Memorial Museum that houses the “I’ll Be Around” B17. A former pilot greeted visitors and autographed his book. On our next visit we can see three more hangars and the Space Gallery. As we exited we encountered a 700 pound B61 nuclear bomb. With a President-elect who didn’t know what the nuclear triad was; made encouraging remarks for Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to acquire nuclear weapons; and publicly wondered why we hadn’t used nuclear bombs, we can only pray that we can survive the next four years.

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