We selected Rancho Sedona RV Park for the maiden excursion with our Winnebago Via 25T. Returning to the Sedona area where we pronounced our wedding vows six years ago was the right spot to introduce a new element in our life adventure. The park offers a full range of amenities such as potable water, electricity, and cable TV which gave us an opportunity to experiment with many of the features in our new rig. We borrowed a barbecue grill and took advantage of their free shower. Oak Creek gurgled behind our tree covered site.

Heart of the West

Heart of the West

Our location just off Highway 179 placed us within walking distance of both Uptown Sedona and hiking trails. We walked up Schnebly Road where we discovered an historic home where Sedona Arabella Miller Schnebly (1877-1950), the wife of the postmaster who named the city, lived in the 1920s and 1930s. We also spotted trailheads for two hiking trails before returning and exploring Sedona. We discovered interesting historical signs on our route to Uptown Sedona. We learned that Sedona, founded in 1902, was mainly a place for farming and ranches until Hollywood discovered it in the 1940s. During the next fifty years most of Hollywood’s stars, from John Wayne to Elvis Presley, discovered the unique red rocks of Sedona. Artists like Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp, discovered this special place, too. It is no surprise, then, to discover that Sedona continues to have dramatic sculpture gracing the sidewalk outside unique boutique shops. Some of my favorite sculptures were “Birdwoman” by John. M. Soderberg, “Changing Woman” by Susan Kliewer, “Heart of the West” and “The Dance” both by James N. Muir. Within the Tlaquepaque Arts & Crafts Village we toured the Farmer’s Market shortly before it closed. I admired “Autumns Challenge” and “Mustang Pride” both by sculptor and gallery owner Chris Navarro. We stopped for lunch at the Oak Creek Brewery & Grill where I once again imbibed with the Seven Dwarfs.

Margs Draw Vista

Margs Draw Vista

We hiked the Margs Draw Trail #163 from the Schneby Hill Trailhead to Sombart Lane. Much of this scenic trail goes through the Munds Mountain Wilderness Area. Once on Highway 179 we passed many sculptures. Some of the more notable included “Follow the Leader” by W. Stanley Procto, “Shaman of Life Giving Fare” by Bill Worrell, “Wind Ripples” by Mark White, “Heralding the Dawn” by Francis Jansen, and “Fences” by James N. Muir. A local friend shared one of her favorite restaurants, The Hideaway House, which offered good views of Snoopy Rock from a patio over the creek. An afternoon shower limited us to indoor activities using wireless connectivity and two TVs. We learned a lot on our first excursion. Life is good!

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