Tower of the Americas

Tower of the Americas

For lunch we had a bird’s eye view of San Antonio from the revolving Chart House Restaurant some 600 feet atop the Tower of the Americas. This distinctive landmark, surrounded at its base with various water fountains, was built for the 1968 World’s Fair. After lunch we went up two floors and walked around the observation level. The Alamodome, located below us, was the San Antonio Spurs’ home from 1993 to 2002 and is now a venue for trade shows, conventions, and concerts. It is hard to fathom that it held 73,086 people at a recent concert. We missed a rain shower while in the Tower of the Americas.

UNAMITA

UNAMITA

The mission of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico (UNAM) is “To support bi-national understanding and integration through education, language teaching, cultural diffusion, academic extension, and synergy with other educational organizations in the United States. “UNAMITA,” another sculpture by Sebastian is located outside the college. It was dedicated in 2004 to recognize 60 years in San Antonio. Inside the college, we visited a gallery filled with sexually accurate pottery from the pre-Hispanic period. Several interesting sculptures grace the grounds between the college and the Convention Center. An open door, “My Home Is Your Home” (Mi casa es tu casa) was a gift from San Antonio’s sister city Monterrey, Mexico in 1992.

We walked around La Villita, the site of San Antonio’s first neighborhood, which dates back to the 1750s. Today it is home to a wide range of artisans.

Guitars in the Market

Guitars in the Market

Later, we walked by the Spanish Governor’s Palace which was built in 1749 as the residence and headquarters for the captain of the Spanish Presidio. Nearby Market Square, El Mercado, with more than 50 shops, is said to be the largest Mexican Market in the U.S. I was encouraged to take a photograph of colorful guitars at one shop, but was not allowed to take a picture of colorful hats in the shop next door. On our return to our hotel, we passed the Santa Rosa Hospital with a striking 9-story image of a young boy holding a dove while his guardian angel (with a part of her wing damaged) watching over him. I later learned that Jesse Treviño, an injured Vietnam vet, completed this mural, “Spirit of Healing,” in 1997. A statue of multi-talented T. C. Frost looks across Houston Street to the modern rendition of the bank, Frost Bank, which he chartered in 1899.

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