Hubbell Trading Post

Hubbell Trading Post

John Lorenzo Hubbell bought William Leonard’s trading post in 1876. The Diné, who we call the Navajo, returned to the area in 1868 following reservation imprisonment in New Mexico and after the brutal ordeal of their Long Walk in 1864. Hubbell traded food and other commodities initially for piňon nuts, wool, firewood, livestock, and produce but later for handmade rugs, jewelry, carvings, baskets, and pottery. For more than 50 years he was known for his neighborly friendship, honest business dealings, and wise counsel to Native Americans.  Explorers, artists, writers, scientists, and notables such as President Theodore Roosevelt enjoyed the hospitality of the Hubbell family. A guide was kind enough to allow us to visit the Hubbell house which is normally open only on the hour. We learned about the art work that decorates every available wall space, marveled at the large collection of books, and noted the baskets attached to the ceiling. We admired the goods available for sale in the Trading Post and walked around the grounds. We were told that the corn seedlings this year have been devoured by an influx of prairie dogs. We learned that after Hubbell died in 1930 and that the Hubbell Trading Post stayed in the family until 1967 when it was sold to the National Park Service to be preserved as a national historical site.

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