Lower Granite Creek Discovery Trail Saturday, Aug 24 2013 

Sacred Thorn-apple

Sacred Thorn-apple

The Lower Granite Creek Discovery Trail is part of the Watson Woods Riparian Preserve, a restoration project near Watson Lake. We passed a deer that was alert to human activity while laying down under a tree. The common sunflowers in the foreground of Watson Lake would have created a picture postcard if the sky wasn’t gray. Some of the other wildflowers that we encountered included sacred thorn-apple, western yarrow, ivyleaf morning-glory, sweet four o’clock, small flowered globemallow, golden columbine, Russian knapweed, Arizona thistle, transpecos morning-glory, wild bergemot, broadleaf cattails, and common mullein. Mosquitoes took advantage of us but their sting was not long lasting. It was good to walk in the woods.

Arizona Pioneer Home Tuesday, Aug 20 2013 

Arizona Pioneer Home

Arizona Pioneer Home

The Arizona Pioneer Home, located on a granite promontory overlooking the City of Prescott, is a retirement home operated and funded by the State of Arizona. A bill to fund it passed the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1907 and it opened on February 1, 1911. It originally housed 40 men, later rooms for 20 women were added. Today it is home for 150 residents who have been Arizona residents for at least 50 years and are 70 years of age or older or are former miners aged 60 or older. Some of the notable residents include Big Nose Kate <Mary K., Cummings> who spent considerable time with Doc Holliday; Albert Franklin Banta, who discovered the Meteor Crater near Winslow, Arizona; and several Harvey House Girls. Yesterday’s Daily Courier had a picture and story about the recent refurbishment of Pioneer Pete, a 14-foot wooden statue that faces the front entrance of the Arizona Pioneers Home. Pioneer Home Foundation board member Beth Mosier and local sign painter Mike Whalen did the statue makeover. The Arizona Pioneer Home is an interesting part of Prescott’s past and present.

Community Nature Center of Prescott Sunday, Aug 4 2013 

teepee at Community Nature Center

Nature Center Teepee

The Community Nature Center of Prescott is located on 18 acres adjacent to the Granite Mountain Middle School. A re-opening is planned for September 14 featuring a native garden. We explored 1.5 miles of new trails ranging from elevations of 5,520 feet to 5,640 feet. Near the beginning of the trail is a log cabin built by high school students during the summer of 1975. An authentic looking teepee also attracted our attention. Near the Williamson Valley Road is an important landmark. An historical sign located at a spring recognizes the Mojave and Prescott Toll Road (the Hardyville Road), a 165 mile road between Prescott and present day Bullhead City on the Colorado River. This wagon road opened in 1865 for the ten-day trip that brought supplies to Prescott before railroads were built. A flock of bushtits entertained us. An ornate tree lizard scrambled across a boulder. The monsoon rains have allowed wildflowers to blossom such as sacred thorn-apple, birdbill dayflowers, golden columbine, beardlip penstemon, Colorado and spreading four o’clocks. Thanks to the City of Prescott and their volunteers for opening yet another trail.