Lynx Creek Ruin

Lynx Creek Ruin

The Lynx Creek Ruin consists of the remains of a four room pueblo situated atop a rise that affords unobstructed views for many miles in all directions.  Archaeologists consider that it was populated by 25-30 people around 1150-1300.  From my perspective, water from Lynx Creek was some distance away.  Corn and squash were likely grown in nearby washes.  The Prescott National Forest provides a helpful flyer that identifies the following plants found along the ¾ mile trail to the ruins that may have been used by Native peoples: manzanita, scrub live oak, alligator juniper, ponderosa pine, piňon pine, prickly pear cactus, skunkbush, mountain mahogany, hedgehog cactus, cliffrose, agave, and beargrass.  Their diet is likely to have depended upon deer, jackrabbits, cottontails, and possibly other animal and bird species.  Speculation upon past area inhabitants’ daily life gives one a greater appreciation for the basic conveniences of today.

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